Polaris

Setup


Running MiniPolaris

Initial Setup on sunburn

First, login in to sunburn (.cs.tamu.edu). Second, setup your work directory by running the following (output is shown in bold) : This will add 3 lines to your .login file to set up your path, manual path, and polaris environment variables. You do need to logout and login again (our source your .login file) before proceeding.

This will install the needed files in your work directory which will be :

where login is your login name. A good idea is to create a symbolic link from your home directory to this directory. For example, I would type : Thus I would only need to change to directory ~/polaris to be in my MiniPolaris working directory.

Initial Setup on linux

First, login in to linux (.cs.tamu.edu). Second, setup your work directory by running the following (output is shown in bold) : This will add 3 lines to your .login file to set up your path, manual path, and polaris environment variables. You do need to logout and login again (our source your .login file) before proceeding.

This will install the needed files in your work directory which will be :

where login is your login name.

Running Polaris

When your $PATH is correctly set, you may run polaris from any directory. polaris is the unmodified MiniPolaris which you may use as a basis of comparison or to provide diagnostic information about a program (such as printing the AST) while you attempt to make your own changes to the compiler. A sample switch file would contain several switches, including the following : The output of polaris is a list file, which includes diagnostic information. You may convert this output to a FORTRAN program with the list2src command : This can then be input into a native compiler.


Compiling MiniPolaris:

The target of the make command is mypolaris, which will eventually create the file ~/polaris/bin/mypolaris_ex (assuming it compiles correctly.) Please note that this is a very large file (over 10 Megabytes!) so you do not want to make multiple copies, and will likely want to delete it when you go home for the day to provide space for others.

Hopefully the last paragraph is no longer the case... the move of MiniPolaris to HP-UX/Linux allows for shared-library versions of the final executable to be created which greatly reduces disk consumption and system utilization during the final link.

The above method of saving the output to make.log while also reading it allows you to monitor the progress, yet keep the output on file so you may closely scrutinize it if necessary. If you compile from within emacs, this is not necessary.

Also, note that since tail -f continues to wait for anything appended to the file, you will have to hit Control-C to exit.

For a more thorough description of the compilation process, see Project 1a.


MiniPolaris